HSM #6 Update – The Deadline is Closing Fast

Bodice front with the rest of the ribbon in place.

Bodice front with the rest of the ribbon in place.

I’ve been working hard on my Edwardian petticoat – after all, the deadline is tomorrow. Eek! This is the first time I’ve designed a garment and being faced with innumerable choices slowed me down. In the end I solved my dilemma by conveniently discovering I didn’t have enough fabric left over from the bodice to make a complete skirt. That, and realizing that using a pre-made bed ruffle from Goodwill meant the cotton-poly blend would need a bit more support than the semi-sheer bodice fabric could give.

So, like all inspired types who find themselves painted into a creative corner, I punted and made up the rest as I went. And I think it’s working.

I used the remainder of the bodice fabric for the upper portion of the skirt and the cotton body of the bed skirt for the lower part. That allowed me to leave the ruffle attached and not spend time messing around with it.

But the fabrics are distinctly different, both in texture and in color…the bodice fabric is a much whiter white. I have plenty of the vintage beading lace, so I used a round to create a softer transition from one fabric to the other.

Petticoat skirt with beading lace in place.

Petticoat skirt with beading lace in place.

Of course, things being as they sometimes are, I seem to have…um…mis-measured a bit.

Drat!!

Drat!!

Fortunately, this is an easy fix. In the end, very few people will notice it…especially since it’s underwear.

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Adding beading lace to the lower ruffle, also to create a nicer look, went smoothly…mostly because I’d learned not to cut anything from the spool before it was all sewn in place.

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The end result was two even rounds of lace, ready for the ribbon.

Upper round, the transition from bodice fabric to the bed skirt cotton.

Upper round, the transition from bodice fabric to the bed skirt cotton.

The lower round, for a nicer transition to the bottom ruffle.

The lower round, for a nicer transition to the bottom ruffle.

To add a bit for heft to the upper portion of the skirt, I doubled the fabric to create a self-facing. Then I whipped it into place and sewed the center front closed up to the opening, adding a small tack at the top end to guard against any damage from tugging while pulling it on overhead.

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At last…time to attach the bodice to the skirt. Hooray!

Now, I’m basically lazy enough to avoid duplicate steps whenever possible. It makes up for the time I lose in silly errors, like cutting the beading lace too short. When I decided to self-face the upper portion of the skirt, I deliberately placed the fold at the top edge. That way I could attach the bodice and create the base of the channel for the front drawstring closure at the same time. It gets a bit “fabric-origami-in-space” at this point, but it works.

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On your right is the bodice pinned to the skirt. Looks all wrong, doesn’t it? But on your left you can see what happens when the top edge of the petticoat is turned up. By doing it this way, the raw edge of the bodice will be enclosed in the drawstring casing and it’s all done in just two passes of the machine. I’ve used this trick before and it’s an absolute winner.

To finish, I need to complete the casing, add the last of the beading lace, thread the ribbon into place and finish the armholes. They keep changing shape slightly, and for the better, as more weight gets added to the bodice so I saved them for last. And by tomorrow evening I should have a petticoat of my own design…that actually fits. How fab is that?

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Sisterhood of the World Bloggers Award Nominees: a follow-up note

Poodles Hanneford in "Circus Daze" (1927)

Poodles Hanneford in “Circus Daze” (1927)

Oh dear. I goofed. I was so pleased to have selected my nominees that I posted them and – oops! – neglected to notify them. My sincere apologies to all. Regardless of how you feel about having been nominated, you shouldn’t have to hear about it on the electronic streets. I’m sending out the notifications now and, again, I’m sorry to have forgotten.

Sisterhood of the World Bloggers Award – Part Two: Paying it Forward

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Now for the fun part – sharing the award and asking those hard questions.

I based these international nominations on my appreciation for the bloggers’ ability to create beautiful reproduction garments and write well about their experience. It’s hard enough to do one or the other, let alone both.

To the nominees – you are under no obligation to accept and I won’t feel hurt if you don’t. Just know I love and appreciate your work. You inspire me to keep learning and trying. Cheers, merci and thank you.

(aliexpress.com)

My ten nominees for the Sisterhood of the World Bloggers Award are:

  1. Aux Belles Choses…Stephanie writes about vintage sewing and fab DIY home dec – in English.
  2. Beth, who writes V is for Vintage. Some very nice vintage work goin’ on there.
  3. Tickety Boo Tupeny – not just vintage sewing but vintage knitting, too. *swoon*
  4. Romancing the Sewn – presented by team Erin and Sophia as they work their way through the Historical Sew Monthly 2015 with very precise recreations.
  5. Amber, aka Lady of the Wilderness, has a degree in Historic Costume Construction. She doesn’t post frequently, but when she does it’s great.
  6. Miss Brilliantine, author of B*tch, Pelisse! As with Lady of the Wilderness, you don’t get quantity – it’s quality all the way. (With some excellent historical sewing hacks that really work.)
  7. Les choses délicates is written in French and in English by an extremely talented historical seamstress. Beautiful photography, too.
  8. A Fractured Fairytale – she covers an enormous range of historic costuming with lovely work and tons of details.
  9. The Lady Victoria, named (not coincidentally) Victoria does incredible work and shares the step-by-step details.
  10. Thread-Headed Snippet, self-described as “Another insufferable history-obsessed amateur seamstress with a penchant for 17th -19th century American fashion.” Fabulous humor in a genre where it’s not often found. Oh, and great sewing, too.

(Note: I have no idea why the first three nominees are showing in red while the rest are not. I didn’t do it on purpose, don’t know why they’re showing up that way and can’t seen to fix it. On my edit screen they all show up in bright blue. I did check all the links and they work. If anyone knows the fix, please let me know. Thanks.)

Edit – well, now they’re all showing up in blue the way they should. I’m pleased, but have no idea how it happened. No biggie.

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My ten questions for them are:

  1. Which of your projects is the one that proved to you “I can do this!”?
  2. If you could eat any one food, as much as you want, without getting too heavy or too thin or having any ill health effects at all, what would it be?
  3. Who do you most appreciate having in your life?
  4. What is your favorite place, and why? It can be anywhere – in your own backyard or around the world. (“In my head” doesn’t count…and is a bit scary.)
  5. If you could dress for only one historical period, assuming you had access to all the help you’d need, which one would it be, and why?
  6. If you absolutely had to dye your hair (no choice about it) in something other than a natural color, what would that color be? Or would you just shave it all off and start hoarding wigs?
  7. What is your favorite kind of hand needlework? Sewing, needlepoint, embroidery, cross stitch…?
  8. If your home was on fire and you only had time to save one pattern from your stash, which one would it be?
  9. Same question, but for fabric. Which single piece of fabric would you save? (And no, you can’t stay and go up in smoke with the stash. No “Fahrenheit 451” options, OK?)
  10. What inspires you to continue creating and blogging when there are so many other things competing for your time every day?

Thanks, again, to one and all for sharing your work and teaching us as you learn.

The Potato Chip Can Thread Catcher

The last time I got together with the other members of SITU-Seattle sewing circle I was once again faced with wrangling and policing all the snippets of thread I’d strewn about. I am not a “compact” designer/artist/crafter/sewer – I tend to spread out. I work harder at keeping “my” area in check when I’m at someone else’s house, especially when there are a lot of people working in close proximity. But thread bits and other drifting pieces of sewing fluff are my downfall…they end up everywhere.

So imagine my delight when I ran across a YouTube video on Pinterest that shows how to make a portable thread catcher out of a potato chip can.

rachel-thelifeofrilely.blogspot.com

rachel-thelifeofrilely.blogspot.com

A lot of you probably already know about this nifty little thing. As you can see, Rachel certainly did. She posted her set of thread catchers just a couple of weeks ago. But it I’d never heard of it until I discovered Angie’s video. I was instantly enthralled and knew I had to make one. And so I have.

Here is the instructional video from AngiesBitsAndPieces and here’s what I did with it. (Please excuse the color changes in the photographs. I worked on it off and on throughout the day yesterday and today, and the light’s been all over the place.)

I used a short can of Pringles potato chips - don't need all the calories from the big can.

I used a short can of Pringles potato chips – don’t need all the calories from the big can.

Two half-inch wide rings. The inner ring trimmed down to fit snugly against the outer ring, the glued together.

Two half-inch wide rings. The inner ring trimmed down to fit snugly against the outer ring, the glued together.

Circles for base cut from facial tissue box. Quilt batting  circles cut from scraps begged from local quilt shop.

Circles for base cut from facial tissue box. Quilt batting circles cut from scraps begged from local quilt shop.

I added this step: a dab of glue in the center of the cardboard to prevent the  batting from slipping around.

I added this step: a dab of glue in the center of the cardboard to prevent the batting from slipping around.

Cardboard base placed batting-side-down in center of cover fabric circle, edge gathered.

Cardboard base placed batting-side-down in center of cover fabric circle, edge gathered.

Drawstring edge pulled snug and tacked closed. Kinda looks like a mutant Oreo cookie.

Drawstring edge pulled snug and tacked closed. Kinda looks like a mutant Oreo cookie.

Paded base circles pinned with wrong sides together, ready for sewing closed around the edges. Now looks like a mutant Oreo cookie throwing star. And draws almost as much blood if one isn't paying attention.

Paded base circles pinned with wrong sides together, ready for sewing closed around the edges. Now looks like a mutant Oreo cookie throwing star. And draws almost as much blood if one isn’t paying attention.

The padded base is done.

The padded base is done.

Here's another deviation from the video. I decided it would be neat to have a contrast color on the ring of the catcher, and that using a stripe fabric for the body would give it a cool twister look when closed. So I went for it.

Here’s another deviation from the video. I decided it would be neat to have a contrast color on the ring of the catcher, and that using a stripe fabric for the body would give it a cool twister look when closed. So I went for it.

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Besides being a fun project, it's 100% hand sewn. You can make one (or a dozen) of there anywhere.

Besides being a fun project, it’s 100% hand sewn. You can make one (or a dozen) of there anywhere.

You could even use a creasing stick or finger press instead of an iron. No electricity required!

You could even use a hera marker or finger press instead of an iron. No electricity required!

Fabric tube folded over and sewn down around the cardboard ring.

Fabric tube folded over and sewn down around the cardboard ring. This shows the true fabric colors.

Next the inside is pulled out (up) and padded base sewn on. Now it looks a bit like a fantasy pig's snout.

Next the inside is pulled out (up) and padded base sewn on. Now it looks a bit like a fantasy pig’s snout.

Padded base pushed back down through center of the ring. Now it's like a fabric cup, which is the goal.

Padded base pushed back down through center of the ring. Now it’s like a fabric cup, which is the goal.

Outside view. Now the edges of the outer fabric tube get turned under and sewn to the padded base.

Outside view. Now the edges of the outer fabric tube get turned under and sewn to the padded base.

All sewn and ready to use.

The sewing is done.

Ready to use!

Ready to use!

At the end of the day, just twist to close.

At the end of the day, just twist to close.

It doesn't matter whether you twist it to the left or to the right...

It doesn’t matter whether you twist it to the left or to the right…

...both work equally well.

…both work equally well.

Two notes of caution, though.

In her video, Angie mentions about making sure your circumference measurements are correct. My Pringles can measured 9 1/4 inches, not 9 1/2. I measured carefully but still had to adjust the side seam of the fabric tube by letting it out a bit over 1/4 inch to get it to fold over the cardboard ring.

In addition, make triple sure the cardboard base circle is small enough to fit into the covered cardboard ring once all the padding is in place. I cut mine a bit too large, and not perfectly circular, so the base of the thread catcher will not push into the ring and stay closed.

Aw, nuts!

Aw, nuts!

That’s my error, not a problem with the instructions.

But it means I have to get to make another one. This is a perfect scrap or fat quarter project.

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Next time, I think I’ll add a fabric loop so I can button the thread catcher onto an apron or a belt loop. And I’ll definitely use my compass to trace a true circle for the base.

In the meantime, my latest little project needs a job. As it just to happens, we’re in a wee bit of a heat wave up here, so…

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…keep an eye out for my upcoming line of portable beer coasters. (You know you want one.)

Your Weekend Wow!

This gown is a little unusual for me, in that I like it better close up than when viewed further away. However, while I can’t help thinking how hot it must have been in a crowded room underneath all that satin and velvet, the iridescent beading is a great touch, the colors are wonderful, the beaded velvet tassels on the back bodice are outrageously fun. The wearer probably made quite an entrance.

Beaded velvet gown from Rufus Lincoln estate, c.1905.

(Photos and info are from textilevintage.com, link above)

1905 beaded gown from the Captain Rufus estate

Made from midnight royal blue velvet with inserts of floral devoré velvet, the two-piece gown has the full bodice front and back-skirt train that were the height of fashion during the Belle Époque.

The beautiful velvet flowers are cut to a ground of substantial-weight matching satin. The bodice, cuffs, and stand-up collar feature beige Venetian-style lace over cream colored satin The lace is trimmed with narrow bands of floral velvet. The eye catching iridescent beaded trim is the coup de grace.

Lined with ivory cotton, the bodice has boned seams. The under bodice closes in front with hooks; the outer bodice closes on the side-front with concealed hooks.

The skirt is lined with black buckram. It has a wide hem facing of navy taffeta and closes in back with a hook at the waist.

RufusLincoln 1

RufusLincoln2

RufusLincoln3

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The condition is almost excellent. The gown shows very little wear.

The bodice measures: 36″ bust, 27″ waist, and 22″ sleeve length.
The skirt measures: 27″ waist, full over the hips, and 43″ front length.

The design of this remarkable historic artifact is sublime; and the provenance is extraordinary—a descendant of Revolutionary War veteran, Captain Rufus Lincoln. The dazzling embellishment tells us that at least one branch of Captain Lincoln’s family had plenty of money during the Opulent Age.

Captain Rufus Lincoln (1751-1838), born in Taunton, MA in 1751, Lincoln held commissions in several Massachusetts regiments. He purchased a homestead “Lincoln Hill” in Wareham, MA from David Nye in 1799. Lincoln’s diary, The Papers of Captain Rufus Lincoln, can be read in the Harvard University Library. The gown, purchased from the Lincoln Hill estate, belonged to one of his descendents.

HSM #6: It’s Beginning to Look at Lot Like…a Petticoat!

The first bit of ribbon is on.

The first bit of ribbon is on.

To my surprise and delight, it didn’t take much time to get my fine motor coordination buffed up enough for hand sewing. I was sure it would take another day or so, but last night the Sisterhood of the World Bloggers Award (many thanks, again, to Catherine) inspired me and I picked up the bodice for the Edwardian petticoat.

When last we saw it, it looked like this:

Playtime! Angled or straight?

Playtime! Angled or straight?

Looking at it with a fresh eye, I decided I didn’t like the shape going on with the hidden front quasi-darts. It just looked too bubbly and, since it’s a drawstring-gathered waistline anyway, they aren’t really needed. Poof! Gone.

I also decided that I wanted a little more interest with the shape of the beading lace, so I angled the self-facing at the center front and ran the beading lace along the turned edge of the facing. That way I was able to hem the facing and apply the beading lace in a single pass. (I hate having to fuss with the same area over and over for no good reason.)

The pink jacquard-weave ribbon was staring hard at me, so I put in the front top ties. When I left it on the Victorian-corseted dress form last night it looked like this:

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This morning, in much better (and natural) light, it looks like this:

front

front

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back

This is my first foray into Edwardian fashion, and at this point I have two questions.

Last night I noticed it wasn’t hanging too well on the dress form. The Victorian-style corset was squeezed and stuffed to my hourglass dimensions and I came to the conclusion that the Edwardian shape wasn’t working on a Victorian form.

So I switched out the corsets and put my underbust, though not truly 1912 Edwardian, corset on the dress form. The waist dimension is correct, but I’ve yet to “fill out” the hips.

2007-03-04 20.12.14

First question: what do I do with the bust? Mine is larger than the fullest settings on the dress form. However, as far as I’ve been able to determine, an underbust corset is correct for 1912 and the fluffy, full mono-bosom look was long gone by then. I need some shape for the dress I’ll be wearing, so “hanging loose” won’t work at all. I’m not even sure where the bust line should be, surely not forced higher than natural (like Regency), but…what?

I have a lot of give and take with the high drawstring waist, which was the whole point of doing it that way. But I can’t finalize the armscye shape and edging/binding until I know 1) where the girls should be and 2) what they should, or shouldn’t, be doing.

Secondly – what should I be wearing under the petticoat and above the underbust corset? Should I have a corset cover? (I think the answer is “yes.”) Chemise under the corset? I do have a set of proper drawers. Anything…um…else?

Sisterhood of the World Bloggers Award – Part One

Sisterhood-of-the-World-Bloggers-Award_Badge

Many, many thanks to Catherine, of Catherine the Teacher (her blog about living history, sewing and crafting is great – you must check it out) for nominating me for a Sisterhood of the World Bloggers Award. I know some people crinkle their nose a bit at these meme awards, but I appreciate knowing my writing means something to my audience and my schnoz is 100% crinkle-free.

As is the custom with these things, there are rules:

1. Thank the blogger who nominated you, linking back to their site. (√)
2. Put the Award logo on your blog. (√)
3. Answer the ten questions sent to you. (√)
4. Make up ten new questions for your nominees to answer. (√)
5. Nominate ten blogs. (√)

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children_writing

The questions put to me are:

1. What type of music and/or movies do you like to have on while you work (work = sewing/creating art).

I love creating to the sound of rain and the smell of damp earth. I grew up in a very dry part of the US and rain is comforting for me. Even better is the that special silence that comes with snow…pure magic.

Otherwise it’s music, and my tastes are wide-ranging. Classical, zydeco, international music from just about anywhere (French chanson, bagpipes [yeah, I’m one of THEM]), gospel, blues, Gregorian chant, a capella (how I miss Anonymous Four)…just about anything other than hard core acid jazz, twangy/tight-throated/nasal Country Western (with apologies to fans of Ms. Tammy Wynette and her “D.I.V.O.R.C.E.“) or Tuvan Throat Singing (which I appreciate as an art form but just cannot get into).

For knitting, it’s television or movies all the way. Here again, my tastes are all over the map – from “Arsenic and Old Lace” to “History of the British Monarchy” to “Amelie” to “Who Killed Roger Rabbit?” and more. I tend to stick with British TV series, but like both British and American crime/mystery – as long as it contains a good dose of intelligent wit and humor amongst the nasty bits, like “Castle”, “Blue Monday”, “Vera”, “Waking the Dead”, “Miss Marple Mysteries” , “Poirot” and “The Miss Phryne Fisher Murder Mysteries” (which is Australian and just the thing when one needs a dose of the 1920’s).

2. What gives you the most satisfaction while working on a new project?

Tied for first place are the planning/research phase and taking the last stitch.

3. What inspires you the most when you are mulling over what to create next?

Pinterest boards, historic fashion plates and historical sewing blogs. I’m strongly visual, so being able to see the forms, colors and techniques is the way to go for me.

4. Does it bother you if your pet lays on your fabric, paper etc while you are trying to work? And what are your pet(s) names?

For a long time I had cats, and if one has cats one must abandon any fantasies about pristine projects and solitary pursuits. (Don’t be fooled, it’s not about sharing time together. They know they need to keep an eye on you).

I currently have a rescue dog, Sophie. She’s a miniature poodle/terrier mix: smart, learns fast, channels Sarah Bernhardt when begging for treats, and loves to run around outdoors (unless it’s raining, then she transforms into Miss Dainty Paws…hates wet grass). She’s pretty good about staying clear of hand sewing…mostly because I’m pretty good at channeling Sarah Bernhardt if she tried to jump into my lap when I’m holding a sharp needle. Knitting, however, is another thing. (I think she’s a closet “Cat’s Cradle” fanatic.)

5. How long ago did you get involved in your hobby?

Oh, if only there was just one. In general: I’ve been machine sewing since the age of eight, embroidering since about 10 or 11, started making my own clothes in earnest somewhere around age of 12, learned to knit (horribly) in high school. I helped myself through nursing school by sewing uniforms for the nurses during the white double-knit polyester years and got into needlepoint and petitpoint in my thirties. I’ve been fascinated by historical dress for as long as I can remember, truly, but only started learning how to make historically based clothing in 2010 (I think). And throw in a couple of decades of quilting, too.

6. What is the ultimate garment that you yearn to create?

I would love to make a Robe à la française in some seriously gorgeous silk and get it 100% spot on. I’ve only recently come to like the style, but now I’m completely enamored of it and them. The next decade’s lookin’ good, so maybe I’ll whip up a little something like these:

7. What has been the mistake that taught you the most?

Being so fired up with enthusiasm when I started this that I went out and bought a ton of fabric and patterns before I knew what I should be buying. A rank beginner has no business ordering 12 – count ’em, twelve – Ageless Patterns™.

8. If you have any advice for someone just starting out in the hobby, what would it be?

(See #7.)

9. Who has been the biggest inspiration and/or mentor when working on projects and/or keeping you motivated?

She doesn’t know it, or me for that matter, but my biggest inspiration comes from Merja in Finland, who has two blogs: Before the Automobile and The Aristocat (that’s not a typo). Her combination of research, historical accuracy, fashion sense, historically appropriate construction techniques and the ability to achieve perfect fit – A PERFECT FIT!! – is literally, for me at least, jaw-dropping. When I grow up I want to sew like she does. If only.

I’ve taken a number of classes from Jennifer Rosbrugh (historicalsewing.com) and they’ve transformed my sewing. She is a great teacher, has a wonderful personality, and is a fabulous coach. I will never neglect to flatline a Victorian-era skirt again.

The third piece of inspiration and mentor-ship comes from my readers. Really and truly. They usually know more than I do. I am comfortable asking the most ridiculous questions because they are kind. (Plus, I respond well to the threat of abject public humiliation, so they inspire me to not get sloppy or do things like using polyester for a Civil War Era ball gown because it’s cheap and machine washes easily…and using a zipper to boot.) They help keep me honest and that means a lot to me.

10. If you could attend any event (historical or otherwise) what would it be and why?

Oh, dear – this is a toughie.

For the present day, I’d give a kidney to participate in the annual Jane Austen bash in Bath, England. So many fellow enthusiasts and history buffs in historical costume – everyday dress, the promenade along The Crescent, the ball, the food and drink, even the proper accent! I think it would be a very fun pseudo-Regency-immersion experience. (“Pseudo” because, well, it’s now, not then.)

As for historical times and events, as long at I don’t 1) get the Plague, 2) get married off to some jerk as part of a doomed political alliance, 3) end up having 18 children (especially with the jerk from #2), 4) have to eek out an existence at the bottom of the economic and social ladder, 5) have the starring role in some human sacrifice ritual or 5) get burned as a witch – I’m pretty open to suggestions.

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Tomorrow: my ten nominees and the questions for them.

It’s Better with Pictures!

Oops! I forgot to add photos to last night’s post, so here they are.

Knitting – sweater in progress, working on the second sleeve, needs blocking when finished:

Yummy yarn, yummy colors. Can't wait for Fall to come.

Yummy yarn, yummy colors. Can’t wait for Fall to come.

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Collection of 1930’s reproduction fabric, gathered here and there over a decade or so:

My 1930’s quilt stash.

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Reproduction 1840’s quilt:

First panel complete!

First panel complete!

First panel complete!

Fabric detail

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Jacquard-weave ribbon with matching embroidery floss and faux pearls for Edwardian petticoat:

Very feminine, isn't it?

A very Edwardian and feminine combination, isn’t it?

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When I was designing and selling quilt patterns I was – and forever remain – “The Fabric Floozie.” On Ravelry (an online knitting community) I’m “EccentricEwe.” Basically, if it involves a needle, some thread and/or fiber I’m all over it. That pretty much sums up my fiber-dependency issues. 😉

Better: slow but sure.

je suis malade

Getting over this whatever-it-was is slow going. You’ve probably noticed the dearth of posts. That’s because my hand-eye coordination is still re-tuning itself. Knitting helps and I’ve been doing a lot of it. But my hand sewing is a bit too shaky for the look I’m after, although it’s improving steadily, and my machine sewing tends to drift from a straight line unless I focus every bit of energy and concentrate. Then I’m exhausted after 20 minutes and frustrated.

In general, I start my day feeling like this:

A couple enjoys an old fashioned zipline on a weekend afternoon. (1923)

A couple on an old-fashioned zipline. (1923)

It doesn’t take long before I’m feeling like this:

"Whaaaa?"

“Whaaaa?”

And by late afternoon:

Sick person going to Lourdes to take the water.

Going to Lourdes to take the water.

I try to be patient with this *tap foot, tap foot, tap foot* while my body heals. Today has been a really good day and the worst has definitely passed.

The knitting is going pretty well now. My stitches are even again. I can do math for the patterns in my head.

I’ve been hoarding collecting 1930’s prints to make a simple quilt for my bed, and I feel good enough to re-start my machine swing on that. This one will be pretty simple and I don’t need to completely finish the top to polish up my skills. Not to mention this will finally get me going on something I’ve been putting off for a long time (hard to choose a pattern, decided to go easy on myself).

In addition, I started English paper-piecing a reproduction of an 1840’s quilt. It’s going to take a while, but there is no rush – I’m just doing it because I’ve always wanted to try and now I have the patience for it. I’ve already cut the fabric hexagons for the next panel, so I think I’ll work on that for an evening or two to get my fine hand-eye motor coordination back up to snuff.

And then it’s back to business.

The top portion of my Edwardian petticoat for HSM #6 is mostly done. Happily, the worst of the fiddly bits are finished. Before all this happened I’d purchased some lovely pink jacquard-weave ribbon for the beading lace. After lace meets ribbon, I’ll start hand-finishing the armholes. Then it’s make a tube, sew on a ruffle, gather the top edge and sew the whole thing onto the bodice portion. After that it’s just a matter of using hooks-and-eyes up the front for an easy closure.

Hmmmm. Probably shouldn’t have said “easy”….

Your Weekend Wow!

I love the use of fabrics (notice the artistically pieced center back), the color combination and the ribbon trim at the cuffs. I wonder what the petticoat (skirt) looked like? Perhaps it featured the dark peach, was festooned with curls and waves in the apricot and had a bow…or two or three…in the salmon-edged ribbon. Peach, apricot and salmon – yummy. Wouldn’t that have been fun?!

Fabulous 18th century French silk caraco from Paris. Rare, original silk ribbons to close at front. Ruched ribbon trim at sleeves. Silk is medium weight “Gros de Tours” in excellent condition. Lined with linen. Beautiful matched pattern at front and back, delightful insertion of second fabric at back. Beautifully finished off with Chinoiserie detailed salmon pink silk ribbons.

Fabric late 1760s or early 1770s, cut is mid 1790s. French. Silk Caraco with Ribbons, Paris. Original silk ribbons to close at front. Ruched ribbon trim at sleeves. Silk is medium weight 'Gros de Tours.' Lined with linen.

Wish it was yours? Sorry – it’s being held on reserve at Trouvais (images copyright trouvais-shop.com), priced at $2400.00 Canadian Dollars. But you never know – the deal might fall through…