Better: slow but sure.

je suis malade

Getting over this whatever-it-was is slow going. You’ve probably noticed the dearth of posts. That’s because my hand-eye coordination is still re-tuning itself. Knitting helps and I’ve been doing a lot of it. But my hand sewing is a bit too shaky for the look I’m after, although it’s improving steadily, and my machine sewing tends to drift from a straight line unless I focus every bit of energy and concentrate. Then I’m exhausted after 20 minutes and frustrated.

In general, I start my day feeling like this:

A couple enjoys an old fashioned zipline on a weekend afternoon. (1923)

A couple on an old-fashioned zipline. (1923)

It doesn’t take long before I’m feeling like this:

"Whaaaa?"

“Whaaaa?”

And by late afternoon:

Sick person going to Lourdes to take the water.

Going to Lourdes to take the water.

I try to be patient with this *tap foot, tap foot, tap foot* while my body heals. Today has been a really good day and the worst has definitely passed.

The knitting is going pretty well now. My stitches are even again. I can do math for the patterns in my head.

I’ve been hoarding collecting 1930’s prints to make a simple quilt for my bed, and I feel good enough to re-start my machine swing on that. This one will be pretty simple and I don’t need to completely finish the top to polish up my skills. Not to mention this will finally get me going on something I’ve been putting off for a long time (hard to choose a pattern, decided to go easy on myself).

In addition, I started English paper-piecing a reproduction of an 1840’s quilt. It’s going to take a while, but there is no rush – I’m just doing it because I’ve always wanted to try and now I have the patience for it. I’ve already cut the fabric hexagons for the next panel, so I think I’ll work on that for an evening or two to get my fine hand-eye motor coordination back up to snuff.

And then it’s back to business.

The top portion of my Edwardian petticoat for HSM #6 is mostly done. Happily, the worst of the fiddly bits are finished. Before all this happened I’d purchased some lovely pink jacquard-weave ribbon for the beading lace. After lace meets ribbon, I’ll start hand-finishing the armholes. Then it’s make a tube, sew on a ruffle, gather the top edge and sew the whole thing onto the bodice portion. After that it’s just a matter of using hooks-and-eyes up the front for an easy closure.

Hmmmm. Probably shouldn’t have said “easy”….

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Your Weekend Wow!

I love the use of fabrics (notice the artistically pieced center back), the color combination and the ribbon trim at the cuffs. I wonder what the petticoat (skirt) looked like? Perhaps it featured the dark peach, was festooned with curls and waves in the apricot and had a bow…or two or three…in the salmon-edged ribbon. Peach, apricot and salmon – yummy. Wouldn’t that have been fun?!

Fabulous 18th century French silk caraco from Paris. Rare, original silk ribbons to close at front. Ruched ribbon trim at sleeves. Silk is medium weight “Gros de Tours” in excellent condition. Lined with linen. Beautiful matched pattern at front and back, delightful insertion of second fabric at back. Beautifully finished off with Chinoiserie detailed salmon pink silk ribbons.

Fabric late 1760s or early 1770s, cut is mid 1790s. French. Silk Caraco with Ribbons, Paris. Original silk ribbons to close at front. Ruched ribbon trim at sleeves. Silk is medium weight 'Gros de Tours.' Lined with linen.

Wish it was yours? Sorry – it’s being held on reserve at Trouvais (images copyright trouvais-shop.com), priced at $2400.00 Canadian Dollars. But you never know – the deal might fall through…